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5G Conspiracy Theories Surface

Mounir Jamil

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5G Conspiracy Theories Surface

The deployment of 5G has causes several concerns amongst people, to such an extent that anti-5G movements have sparked across various countries, and several 5G conspiracy theories started gaining momentum on social media.

Some far right-wing people have even developed 5G conspiracy theories linking 5G to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Other activists went as far as setting fire to telecommunication towers in Belgium, Netherlands, and Quebec.

False news and 5G conspiracy theories have been widespread on social networks, relayed by celebrities and influencers only reinforcing the fears of people who already were suspicious of 5G’s potential health effects.

5G Conspiracy theories argue that the spread of the virus in Wuhan China is directly linked to the large number of 5G towers in the city. However in reality, 5G networks are not even full deployed on towers. Other theories claim that 5G waves emitted would weaken our immune system.

WHO has already warned the public about misinformation related to 5G, insisting that networks do not spread COVID-19 and that viruses do not simply circulate over radio waves or mobile networks. Most importantly, the pandemic is spreading in several countries that don’t even have a 5G mobile network.

5G is expected to cope better with the increase in global data traffic predicted in the upcoming years. In addition to improving on the technical aspects of the 4G network, 5G crosses the ultimate frontier essential for simultaneous communication between machines.

5G will have several impacts, mainly accelerating the automation of industries, development of smart cities, introduction of autonomous vehicles, and telehealth and remote surgery.

Scientists however are concerned about possible effects of exposure to the electromagnetic fields that are generated by devices connected to 5G networks.

Studies report some symptoms shown in electrosensitive people such as stress, heart problems, headaches, and impaired cognitive functions. However, no causal link can be found today between these symptoms and the technology.

Research conducted by WHO concludes at this time that 5G does not pose a danger to health, given national and international standards that limit the exposure to radio frequencies.

 

Junior social media strategist with a degree in business. Passionate about technology, film, music and video games.

MedTech

90-minute COVID-19 testing device

Mounir Jamil

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CovidNudge-Testing-Device-scaled

Since the emergence of the novel Coronavirus, scientists, healthcare workers and physicians have stressed on the need for more rapid diagnostic testing. A recent study from Imperial College London shows that a new testing device can yield results in just 90 minutes.

The new paper, published in the Lancet Microbe, claims that the new testing device, dubbed CovidNudge, has successfully matched time-consuming laboratory test results. This means that waiting days for a COVID-19 test result will soon be a thing of the past.

The testing on the CovidNudge started back in April, when a research team led by Professor Graham Cooke began trawling three different hospitals across London and Oxford looking for noses and throats to swab. They managed to obtain 386 samples from three different groups: emergency department patients with suspected Coronavirus, self-referred healthcare workers with suspected Coronavirus, and hospital-admitted patients with or without COVID-19.

Paired samples indicated that Cooke’s group can directly compare the accuracy of their 90-minute testing device with centralized lab tests. Cooke explained in a press release that the results were remarkable. He claimed that the CovidNudge does not have a trade-off between speed and accuracy, the testing device can achieve both.

The CovidNudge is basically a portable PCR platform that is spread across two devices:

a blue container, weighing in at 40g, called the DnaCartridge, which looks similar to the container you might put your retainer in at night. A nose and throat swab are taken from the patient and are then inserted directly into the DnaCartridge. The cartridge is then placed in the NudgeBox processing unit, a box roughly the size of a shoebox and coming in at 5kg. This packs in all the testing equipment needed to run a real-time PCR test.

The CovidNudge had spectacular performance, as it achieved an overall sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100% when compared with lab-based tests. Out of the 386 samples collected, the CovidNudge confirmed 67 positive results, compared to 71 positive results from lab tests.

The testing device is produced by DnaNudge, an Imperial start-up that includes clinicians and doctors from Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Chelsea & Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, DnaNudge, and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. So far, it has been deployed and installed in eight London hospitals.

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Nurturing your mental health during a pandemic

Mounir Jamil

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Nurturing your Mental Health during a Pandemic

Certain COVID-19-related words such as social distancing, pandemic, and quarantine are enough to make anyone feel anxious. While maintaining a distance from others helps mitigate the spread of the coronavirus, it does take a certain toll on our mental health. Luckily technology presents possible solutions for those of us who are battling with depression and anxiety.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has surveyed upwards of 5,000 American adults and has found that symptoms for anxiety and depression skyrocketed between April and June this year. The number quadrupled, as approximately four times the amount of people have reported that they are depressed in 2020 compared to 2019.

From the population surveyed, almost 10% claimed that they seriously considered suicide over the past 30 days, and ¼ of young people aged 18-24 admitted the same. With this survey indicating that 40% of US adults are struggling with mental health conditions or substance abuse, researchers wondered if certain factors such as unemployment, lack of school structure, isolation, and other financial concerns were key stressors amid the pandemic.

CDC offers telehealth as a practical and effective means of treatment for COVID-19 mental health conditions. Earlier in March, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced that it will be expanding what Medicare would pay for regarding virtual visits. Patients will have more access to e-visits after payment for doctors, clinical psychologists and licensed clinical workers have been approved.

Not everyone is comfortable with visiting a doctor for their mental health. Mobile apps offer practical and convenient methods that are applied in face to face therapy.

Take Sanvello as an example. Sanvello now has more than three million people using their app for peer support, self-care, therapy, and coaching. The app offers daily mood tracking, coping tools to manage stress, anxiety and depression, along with guided journeys. You can speak directly to a coach that is trained in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or even join a live video group class.  A study from the Oregon Health and Science University has found that adults aged over 60 that used video chat applications had almost half the risk of depression. In the survey, researchers found that using texting and social media showed little effects in boosting spirits. However Skype and FaceTime seemed to be better tools for alleviating depressive symptoms and uplifting one’s mental health.

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Impacts of the pandemic on SMEs: First in, first out

Adnan Kayyali

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Impacts of the pandemic on SMEs First in, first out

The pandemic sent shockwaves across the world with many SMEs bearing the brunt of the crisis due to the reduction in global demand for goods and services.  

The worst effect of the pandemic on SMEs were the mass layoffs seen throughout all industries, although disproportionately. Disposable income that could have circulated in the economy became scarce, leaving many SMEs susceptible to permanent closure as people spend their money with greater caution. This was only a few weeks into the crisis, and prior to any government aid.

Business owners had very different predictions about the duration of the pandemic, leading them to make varied decisions on whether or not to keep their employees, cut their losses, or whether to save up or spend their stimulus checks. Many business owners were paying from their own pocket to stay afloat, and could not last more than a few weeks or few months, with layoffs.

A survey of more than 5,800 small businesses between March 28 and April 4, 2020 was conducted to determine how adaptable businesses were to the sudden change of the market and social landscape, and the impacts of the pandemic on SMEs.

According to the survey, 92% of SMEs changed at least one thing in their business model to adapt to COVID-19, most using some form of digital technology to bypass, adapt, or improve many traditional – potentially risky – ways of doing business.

Noting that some companies selected more than one option, the changes were listed as follows:

  • 58% of businesses said that they had adopted a new online delivery channel
  • 40% created new virtual services
  • 36% listed the use of a new offline delivery channel, such as Uber Eats.
  • 31% had released a new product.
  • 19% new customers

Consequently, the survey also listed the 5 most commonly mentioned challenges that these businesses have experienced:

  • 22% lack of employee skills
  • 16% lack of adequate funds
  • 14% setting up new online delivery channels
  • 9% developing new products.
  • 8% faced challenges adapting to the new health and safety standards
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