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How Healthcare AI could have stopped COVID-19 before it began

Adnan Kayyali

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How Healthcare AI could have stopped COVID-19 before it began

AI can help make complex problems simple, and allow humans to do more meaningful and innovative work with the smart tools at their disposal across many industries

While AI has been used in healthcare for a while now and the advancements continue, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced researchers, startups and stakeholders to push boundaries and break new ground. Here are some areas in which the adoption of Healthcare AI makes work easier for doctors, improving the quality of life for patients, and advance healthcare overall:

Research and Development

The rapid analysis of large volumes of data is what healthcare AI is all about. Data collected from hospitals, wearables, and telemedicine can be used to curb the impact of viruses such as COVID-19.

One method used to achieve this involves deep learning. Using AI to identify possible treatments derived from previously recorded data narrows down and speeds up the diagnostic process and vaccine development.

Uncovering the history of the virus, detecting patterns in its behavior and commonalities in its transmission, as well as recording and categorizing diagnostics and safety methods from previous viruses is how progress is made. Healthcare AI helps doctors and researchers get a clearer picture of all this, and predictive algorithms can help prepare hospital healthcare workers and governments preemptively.

Detection and Diagnosis

From heat sensor cameras and contract tracing applications to wearables with symptom trackers, these tools pool data into a database for predictive and rapid warning, diagnosis, and detection.

AI powered systems for rapid or even early diagnosis use data from other patients to predict if someone is infected before symptoms show, which is far more effective, as transmission often occurs in the first few weeks of infection, before symptoms arise.

Contract tracing apps can be used to trace transmission chains, and predict which areas are most likely to be hit and can contribute to early warnings that help hospitals, populations and governments prepare their resources for a possible wave of infections.

The data gathered must be categorized and organized with absolute care for maximum accuracy, but the main benefit is to make as accurate a prediction as possible.

Resource allocation, logistics, and response

Systems, already spread thinly by the magnitude of the COVID-19 virus, can benefit greatly from healthcare AI in that resource allocation can be done with more clarity and accuracy than before. Where many hospitals were sporadically made to accommodate increasingly large numbers of patients, draining healthcare systems and facilities around the world, AI can help ease the tension.

All of the aforementioned tracing apps, early diagnosis, pattern recognition and the like can be used to warn communities of a possible wave about to strike, allowing for rapid allocation of resources, facilities and equipment, which, as we’ve learned in the first few months of the pandemic, would have made all the difference.

Junior social media strategist with a degree in media and communication. Technology enthusiast and free-lance writer. Favorite hobby: 3D modeling.

MedTech

What’s holding remote learning back?

Mounir Jamil

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remote learning

The pandemic triggered a shift to remote work that has been relatively smooth due to most modern offices already using an array of communication and collaboration tools. However, the case is not so similar for remote learning.

Right now, the best technology at our disposal can’t solve some of the inherent problems of remote learning and virtual schools. We examine some of the hurdles in remote learning.

The digital divide is ever-present 

An early concern since the start of the pandemic is that low-income students have less access to the internet and to devices, which all directly impact the remote learning strategy. And unfortunately, there has been little evidence to indicate improvement. 

A recent survey found that 75% of Black and Latino families that have children in under-resourced schools in Los Angeles do not use computers regularly. It also indicated that 47% of the total parents surveyed had never even visited the Edtech platforms used as part of the remote learning experience.

So, in many cases, even if the technology needed for remote learning is available, children from low-income families have difficulties logging in and utilizing the platform consistently. 

The needs of an IT department and students vary

Some of the primary concerns of a university’s CIO or a school’s IT administrator are, how secure is the software, administrator authorization, ease of integration with existing software, and privacy concerns. While students are simply looking for a smooth interface equipped with features that ultimately facilitate the learning experience and make it easier.

As such, several schools or universities simply stick with the software they are currently using. This has created a major issue in remote learning for startups and capital investments, and the pandemic has only made them even more risk-aversive.

Existing tech can’t be just slipped into education  

Eric Reicin, President and CEO of BBB National Programs highlights that, “The variety of the tools we use in business… were designed for business and not students”.

With that in mind, it’s important to distinguish that products like Slack, Microsoft Teams or Zoom that have been critical for keeping businesses afloat during the pandemic might be ill-suited for younger students who struggle with usability and have limited attention spans. 

This also means that these tools may not necessarily comply with the existing requirements and guidelines that schools have for the education platforms they are currently using. 

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MedTech

Tech employment – losses and recovery

Adnan Kayyali

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Tech employment

In previous articles, we have tackled the impact of the pandemic on various professions and industries. However, there has been a notable surge in innovation and employment in the tech industry.

This may come as a surprise to many. After all, the pandemic shook the foundations of global market overall, and everything with it. While the tech employment market did take a hit, the impact was substantially less than other industries.

Areas of tech such as cybersecurity, data analysis and science, and communication have been more essential than ever since the pandemic began, and reports confirm that tech employment was on the rise well before the pandemic began.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak until July, the number of jobs in the tech sector had risen by 200,000 while people in other sectors were being laid off. Later however, came the decline. According to Indeed, in June, companies began to slowly cut away at the number of IT jobs made available. Tech employment posts were down as much as 36% by the end of July.

According to an analysis by CompTIA of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ most recent study, IT jobs across all sectors have declined by around 134,000.

Technical IT jobs and help desk work seem to be doing slightly better than others. Companies are still trying to navigate the turbulent changes of the pandemic, and the transitions to remote work, and so most companies, even under economic strain, are reluctant to let go of any IT employees.

“Tech’s failure to recover is probably due to the high cost of hiring and firing”, according to Indeed in a statement to ZDnet “While a restaurant may take on workers based on demand experienced over the past two weeks, sectors like tech have much longer planning horizons.”

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MedTech

Contactless tech deployed in restaurant chains amid pandemic

Mounir Jamil

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As we continue adapting to the pandemic, we notice that our needs as consumers are rapidly changing. Not so long ago, standing in-line at a packed fast food chain, waiting to get served, was considered to be the norm in dining experiences; we can evidently see how this scenario can’t be applied in the time of COVID-19. 

Enter contactless tech – a solution that has proven itself to be a fundamental necessity amid the pandemic. Technology teams from several restaurant chains have been trying to implement contactless tech to streamline visits, enhance the customer journey, and ultimately make their employees life easier. 

Various types of contactless tech ranging from QR codes to robots have aided restaurant chains. We break down the top contactless tech ideas that were brought forward by technology chief attendees of Restaurants Rise powered by MUFSO in a panel titled Touchless Tech: How chains are reimagining technology with the use of contactless ordering and the resurgence of QR codes. The panel was sponsored by Ziosk. 

The comeback of QR codes

QR codes which have already been around for a decade or so, started making their way back into the limelight before the pandemic hit, proving their value as a practical type of contactless tech. QR codes have become an integral part for Tocaya Organica, a 16-unit “experiential fast-casual” chain serving Mexican food in California and Arizona that’s part of The Madera Group.

The technology allows guests to point their smartphones at the codes placed on tables, pull up the restaurant menu and order. Each table has a custom QR code, allowing servers to know where to bring the orders once they’re ready. 

Justin Keenen, Tocaya Organica’s Director of Information Technology commented that the team “had to make sure that that experience carried over as much as possible,” as the restaurant chain moved away from traditional counter service to placing an order at the table using QR codes.

Guests can point their phones at the codes on each table, pull up the restaurant’s menu and order. Each table has its own QR code, so servers know where to bring the orders when they’re ready, and Keenen hired the tech company Thanx to build access to the chain’s loyalty program on top of the Olo ordering software, allowing guests to accrue and redeem points from their phone.       

Keenen added that about 80% of the users surveyed provided “overwhelmingly positive feedback,” with the contactless tech being very easy to use.

Geo-tagged pickup

Popular El Pollo Loco, the fast-casual grilled chicken chain with 480 locations has now enabled geo-tagged curbside pickup at 95% of all its locations according to Andrew Rebhun, the chain’s Vice President and Digital Officer.

With curbside pickup being planned for 2021, once the pandemic hit, those plans were expedited. Rebhun and the team worked to launch the service via the El Pollo Loco app this summer, starting with 20 restaurants and quickly scaling up. 

It’s also a contactless tech that is fairly easy to use. Customers opt into GPS tracking, which will then alert the restaurant as they are driving up, allowing the team members to bring their order directly out to the car. 

Guests that don’t want to opt in for GPS, can simply click the “I’m here” button and a crew member will be out with a face mask to deliver the order. 

Vice President of Technology at White Castle (fast food chain with 360 locations) Susan Carroll-Boser told Restaurants Rise attendees that they are currently testing two new technologies at one location in Indiana: Flippy the Robot and a new drive-thru menu board with artificial intelligence

Flippy the robot

The headline grabber is Miso Robotics’ Flippy the robot.

White Castle is deploying the “robot on a rail” mechanism to work the fry station. It operates above the fryer, so it doesn’t bother any team members.

Flippy operates with a smart freezer provided by Computer Vison. This smart freezer controls portions and schedules when items are to be fried, with human team member supervision

AI Powered Drive-Thru Menu Board

The same White Castle branch in Indiana is also testing an AI powered drive-thru menu board. 

By using voice recognition technology from SoundHound, the menu board has the ability to listen and respond to customers. Guests can select a “known-user experience” that allows the AI to recommend items from the menu tailored to them. 

The contactless tech is also capable of performing “basket analysis” and can assess what’s been ordered and make really good suggestions as to what customers might want to add. 

Using voice recognition technology from SoundHound, the menu board can listen to and respond to customers. According to Carroll-Boser, a person can opt into a “known-user experience” that allows the AI to recommend menu items tailored for the customer.

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