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IoT in healthcare set to skyrocket at $469.4 bn by 2027

Inside Telecom Staff

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IoT in Healthcare

It is without a shadow of a doubt that the pandemic has brought the world to a golden age of technology, as it accelerated digital transformation and technological innovations that will forever shape how we lead our lives.

The obvious champion of the pandemic was the healthcare industry, which saw it being infused with a plethora of tech-oriented solutions, inventions, and render the experience as seamless as possible.

Technological advancements are making a mark across the healthcare industry to a considerable extent. Monitoring and diagnosing patients are of utmost importance in the healthcare sector. The increasing use of connected technologies like IoT has resulted in overwhelming innovations.

Thus, all these factors bring immense growth prospects for the IoT in healthcare market.

IoT, or the Internet of Things, is a form of connected technology that uses data to customize real-time monitoring aspects and enhance customer experience. IoT is used extensively to enable real-time health monitoring and usually accesses patient health data.

The data proves to be a treasure for the stakeholders in the healthcare sector as it helps in enhancing patient health. Thus, all these advantages help in boosting the growth prospects of the Internet of Things in healthcare market.

A new study by Transparency Market Research (TMR) analyzed the overall development of the IoT in healthcare market in recent times. TMR experts project the IoT in healthcare market to record a whopping CAGR of 20.9 percent across the forecast period of 2019-2027.

The global IoT in healthcare market is estimated to reach a valuation of $469.4 billion by 2027, the end year of the forecast period.

With the advent of IoT in healthcare, patients’ interactions are not just limited to text messages, visits, and calls. IoT in healthcare has enabled doctors and clinicians to monitor the progress of their patients frequently.

 The data provided by IoT helps in increasing patient engagement and satisfaction due to more efficiency and accuracy. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic will have a massive positive impact on the growth of the IoT in healthcare market.

Vaccine to boost IoT in Healthcare

COVID-19 vaccines are the key to reducing the effect of the pandemic around the world.

Mass vaccination drives are being conducted across the globe through varied vaccination drives; thus, connected technologies play an important role in the manufacture and supply of vaccines.

The Smart Fridge by Weka is a classic instance. This fridge uses IoT to allow remote monitoring of vaccines and ensures that the vaccines are stored at the right temperature. These factors will play an important role in increasing the growth rate of the Internet of Things in healthcare market.

Connected Ambulances

IoT in healthcare is not just limited to devices; the technology is making a great impact on emergency services as well.

Ambulances play a major role in providing emergency services. These ambulances, if connected with the IoT can help in addressing the issues of the patients with utmost care.

Unlike standard ambulances, IoT-enabled ambulances are connected to remote consultation rooms. It enables the paramedics to consult patients remotely and diagnose their problems immediately without wasting much time. All these factors bode well for the growth of the Internet of Things in healthcare market.

IoT in Healthcare Market: Uses in COVID-19 Pandemic

The growing transmission levels and the increasing strain on the healthcare facilities boost the need for connected technologies extensively. Here’s how the IoT in healthcare is playing a significant role during the pandemic according to the study by TMR:

  • IoT devices are speeding up the COVID-19 detection processes by capturing patient data and other information.
  • During the COVID-19 quarantine period, the patients can be monitored remotely by the authorities through wearables and similar technologies.
  • Crowd monitoring devices powered by IoT will help ensure social distancing in public spaces.

While these innovations and inventions have massive room to disrupt the healthcare market, many experts have made the point that we remain at the tip of the technological iceberg, with much more to come.

We’re a diverse group of industry professionals from all corners of the world. Our desire is to provide a high-quality telecoms publication that caters to an international market, offering the latest and most relevant telecoms information to businesses, entrepreneurs and enthusiasts.

IoT

Telstra secures largest IoT contract with water utility firm

Karim Husami

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largest IoT contract

Australian-based operator Telstra said it has won a 15-year contract from Yarra Valley Water to provide one million industrial IoT services on Telstra’s IoT network.

Telstra says this is its largest IoT deal to date and the first large-scale IoT deployment using Telstra’s new cloud-based platform-as-a-service IoT Connection Manager (ICM). Telstra will deploy its ICM platform to enable Yarra Valley Water gain access to near real-time data from a range of in-field sensors.

“Instead of getting four data points a year, our IoT Connection Manager will now allow Yarra Valley Water to get more than 17,000 data points annually for a much more accurate, near real-time, and robust understanding of its water infrastructure,” Telstra’s group owner of industry solutions and IoT Mark Chapman said.

Cellular low power wide area network

The Yarra Valley Water solution leverages Telstra’s cellular low power wide area network (LPWAN), which offers an IoT coverage of around 4 million square kilometers for NB-IoT and over 3 million square kilometers for LTE-M.

Yarra Valley Water Managing Director, Pat McCafferty, said: “Internet of Things devices are a game changer for the water industry. By deploying a range of different sensors into our water and sanitation networks, we can detect leaks, minimise water wastage and save our customers money.”

Telstra said that its IoT network currently has over 4 million connections in the country.

As part of the agreement, Telstra will provide the IoT connectivity and the ICM Platform to enable sensor readings to be collected automatically in near real-time.

This will enable the utility company to prevent leaks from becoming bursts, sewer blockages from becoming spills, and notifying customers about issues on their properties so they can act quickly.

17,000 data points annually

Telstra Group Owner of Industry Solutions and IoT Mark Chapman said: “Instead of getting four data points a year, our IoT Connection Manager will now allow Yarra Valley Water to get more than 17,000 data points annually for a much more accurate, near real-time, and robust understanding of its water infrastructure.”

He added: “This is a great example of how our leading IoT network and platform is helping organizations use connected technology to drive positive customer experiences and help remotely monitor its assets and complex infrastructure.”

Telstra, which had launched 5G in May 2020, is currently using its spectrum in the 3.6 GHz band to provide 5G technology across Australia. Some of the cities in which Telstra offers its 5G service are Canberra, Central Coast, Brisbane, Sidney, Cairns, Gold Coast, Adelaide, Hamilton, Melbourne and Perth.

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IoT

Global eSIM shipments to reach 822 mil by 2025, as smart cities drive growth

Inside Telecom Staff

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smart cities

A new Juniper Research study found that the number of global eSIM module shipments will increase from 430 million in 2020 to 822 million in 2025; representing a growth of 90 percent.  

The research identified the public sector as the fastest-growing area, with shipments of eSIM‑enabled public sector sensors expected to increase by 500 percent over the next four years, as smart city services benefit from the flexibility of the growing eSIM ecosystem. 

The new research, eSIMs: Sector Analysis, Emerging Opportunities & Market Forecasts 2021-2025, found that smart street lighting sensors will account for 88 percent of eSIM shipments within the public sector by 2025.  

“We predict that smart city providers will leverage cellular networks, underpinned by eSIMs, as gateways to low-power connections for the monitoring and management of smart city services,” the report pointed out.  

NA Smart Cities achieve global dominance 

The report predicts that the U.S. will remain the largest market for public sector eSIM adoption; accounting for 30 percent of eSIMs installed in devices by 2025.  

It highlighted that “operators in North America have led the development and roll-out of 5G networks, which has enabled new levels of city-wide automation and information sharing in smart cities.”  

Government authorities in other regions must follow the example set by smart cities in North America to ensure the smooth transition from legacy technology to smart sensors underpinned by robust eSIM technology. 

Standalone 5G Networks Key for Future Smart Cities 

The study urges eSIM vendors to develop 5G-capable modules to capitalise on the growth of next‑generation 5G standalone networks, which enables the deployment of 5G-enabled eSIMs within smart cities. 

Research author Scarlett Woodford noted: ‘To support smart city initiatives, eSIM vendors must invest in the development of 5G-enabled form factors. By combining flexible network connectivity with high bandwidth transmission and reduced latency, 5G-capable modules will enable local authorities to monitor connected sensors in real-time and allocate resources accordingly.’ 

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IoT

The Internet of things and your home security

Adnan Kayyali

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Internet of things

Internet of Things based technology erupted into popularity mainly during the pandemic and is only accelerating in adoption to this day. Some figures project the IoT market to grow to around 1.6 trillion by 2025. In a decade or so, smart home security will be many more people’s business.

Being a relatively young technology, many IoT devices may be susceptible to vulnerabilities and loopholes yet unknown or unaddressed by the manufacturer. This is the reality of it.

To get two things straight right off the bat.

First, often the most common way to hack Internet of Things based systems and household surveillance is by direct targeting. The likelihood that a skilled hacker with the education and dedication to specifically target your house is low.

That is not to say that it doesn’t happen. At the hands of tech-savvy criminal network perhaps.

Second, if a skilled hacker is hell-bent on targeting your home specifically, they can find a way in, and your best bet is to make the task both more difficult and less rewarding if successful.

In the event of an attack, the motives are usually targeted DDoSing for ransoming data, surveillance for robbery when the owner is not home, or installing crypto mining software to mine off your electric grid.

Here are some ways to strengthen your defenses:

Store your data internally. Memory cards with around 150 GB of memory can store your camera footage and overwrite old videos to make room for new ones. for your cameras to feed into assures the footage is stored behind closed doors.

Change your router name. Don’t use your name or family name as the router name, and it is often advised to change the default name as it contains the manufacturer and model. This is information that a hacker can use.

Toughen your password. It always comes back to this. If your password is “password,” you are essentially leaving the house key under the doormat. Get creative, and use a *P@$$Wordz_L1k3 tH!$*. Not that one though.

Invest in the latest security software and firewalls. It may be pricier, but if you believe your house may be targeted for whatever reason, it is a worthwhile investment.

Use guest networks. Pretty much all modern routers can host a secondary network, or guest network. Use that for your home devices and separate it from the rest of your electronics. Better to compromise the smart fridge than your work laptop.

Disable features when not in use. Many Internet of Things devices have features like remote activation and voice recognition. If you are worried about these devices being used to spy on you or gain access from afar, disable them from the devise itself.

Talk less. The good-old street smarts; Don’t say what you don’t need to say. In other words, don’t brag to your pub mates about your shiny new home security system. Don’t tell your mutual friend’s mutual friend about your crypto wallet and how much you made trading.

If you follow these steps, you greatly decrease your chance of a breach from any source and avoid the worst in case of one. Then nobody can use your smart fridge to murder you.

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