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Microsoft online courses for the unemployed

Adnan Kayyali

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Microsoft online courses

Microsoft online courses have been created on LinkedIn in support of those hit hardest by the pandemic. The pandemic has caused widespread devastation to worldwide economies, affecting different parts of the world in varying degrees. One thing is for sure, worldwide unemployment hasn’t been this high since The Great Depression.

According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), it is projected that the economic and labour crisis brought about by the pandemic may see around 25 million additional people unemployed worldwide.

What’s more, they estimate that some 436 million businesses in sectors such as retail, manufacturing, wholesale, hospitality and others are at high risk of “serious disruption”. Some businesses and jobs may bounce back after the pandemic, but there will most certainly be permanent changes to the post-Coronavirus job landscape.

“This is no longer only a global health crisis, it is also a major labor market and economic crisis that is having a huge impact on people.” Said Director-General of ILO, Guy Ryder.

“For millions of workers, no income means no food, no security and no future” he later continued. “As the pandemic and the jobs crisis evolve, the need to protect the most vulnerable becomes even more urgent.”

In response to the crisis, we are seeing tech companies push relief efforts on their own platforms, assisting severely affected communities through various means. Efforts like information platforms, live maps, updated news, and even platforms to ease distribution of medical resources worldwide, have become invaluable tools.

Microsoft online courses are meant to boost efforts in education, with the company distributing $20 million in donations to numerous NGOs, aimed at aiding those impacted by unemployment.

Using its own tool, LinkedIn Learning Paths was designed with tutorials to kickstart a person’s career in 10 fields currently in high-demand, according to LinkedIn’s data. These jobs will offer livable wages with promising future prospects.

The jobs listed include: digital marketer, graphic designer, IT support, sales representative, project manager, IT administration, software developer, customer services rep, data analyst, financial analyst. With courses free of charge and available to everyone until March 2021, anyone can go to this link and learn a new trade.

The education portal is part of a global trend pushing towards remote education inclusion in mainstream education systems. Microsoft online courses are just a drop among thousands of hours of quality educational material offered by companies such as Udemy, Skillshare, The Great Courses Plus and many more.

Alongside these, Microsoft Learn is offering supplemental technical content to these Paths, and Microsoft is also making GitHub’s Learning Lab free to practice if you’re learning skills to become a software developer.

Junior social media strategist with a degree in media and communication. Technology enthusiast and free-lance writer. Favorite hobby: 3D modeling.

MedTech

Hospital Data System to Guide Precision Lockdowns

Adnan Kayyali

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Hospital Data System to guide precision lockdowns

Governments, leaders, and officials need a method to enable countries to keep on living with the virus for an extended period of time.

Many predict that nations will be moving in and out of lockdown until a vaccine is introduced, which may take many more months. In the meantime, communities will need clear guidelines to proceed with absolute caution.

A new method has been devised by researchers at Northwestern University and the University at Austin. The framework published by the two universities describe a hospital data system that helps deal with these situations in a more efficient, precise and timely way.

The paper released in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), outlined the new hospital data system.

The system enables, policy makers, leaders and officials to have clear and early indication of when cases are about to rise above a certain threshold. With this data, they can make informed decisions on when to implement short-term lockdowns, and minimize economic and socioeconomic fallout, as well as easing burdens on the thinly spread healthcare systems.

 “Communities need to act long before hospital surges become dangerous. Hospital admissions data give an early indication of rapid pandemic growth, and tracking that data will ensure that hospitals maintain sufficient capacity,” said David Morton, research lead, professor and department chair at Northwestern University.

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MedTech

COVID-19 ‘mobile-lab’ treatment helps nursing homes

Adnan Kayyali

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COVID-19 ‘mobile-lab’ treatment helps nursing homes

The pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly and Company is hard at work to deliver the second best thing to a vaccine we can hope for to nursing homes across the US. The company is going around elderly homes testing patients and staff for COVID-19, and administering their COVID-19 ‘mobile-lab’ treatment, as well as extracting antibodies from those who have already healed from the virus for further research.

The Company is doing this in a rather unconventional way. The company is bringing the lab to the nursing homes by driving around in RVs kitted out as makeshift testing labs.

Elder care facilities are linked to 40% of COVID-19 related deaths, and so it would make perfect sense to start using this temporary boost where people are most vulnerable.

The drug itself is made of natural antibodies that have been produced by the body after being exposed to the coronavirus. The antibodies for this particular drug are extracted from early survivors of the virus, and manufactured on a large scale. It does not give long-term protection, but researchers know that their COVID-19 ‘mobile-lab’ treatment does boost the body’s immune response for a time after injection.

“We wanted to see if we could help people in nursing homes because the disease has been so devastating,” said Chief Scientific Officer of Eli Lilly, Dr. Dan Skovronsky on CNBC’s “The Exchange.”

Antibodies have proven to be viable lifesaving treatments for diseases like Ebola in the past, and may prove so again until an actual vaccine hits the shelves. In the meantime, it could prove lifesaving for vulnerable people and those on the front lines of the pandemic like necessary workers and healthcare professionals.

The goal here is to make the treatment preventative. Currently it is only useful after a patient has taken ill with the virus. The next stage of testing involves 2,400 volunteers to see if the COVID-19 ‘mobile-lab’ treatment can be used as an auxiliary protective measure that is both more available and easier to produce than a vaccine currently.

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MedTech

Living with COVID-19: How long will this last?

Adnan Kayyali

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Living with COVID-19: How long will this last?

COVID-19 isn’t going anywhere for a while. Researchers warn that we may have to start getting used to living with COVID-19 well into 2021 and possibly 2022. A UN report as well as interviews with several university professors and researchers sheds some light onto our situation, and the way out.

Promising leads on vaccines are in the works and making progress. Some institutions and partnered efforts promise a protective vaccine by as early as September. The World Health organization projects that there will be around 2 billion vaccine doses by the end of next year. That is however, a long way away, and still leaves another 4 billion people living with COVID-19 as it rises and spreads.

A UN report measuring the effective response and coping mechanism of each country to the pandemic specifies that we are still in the early stages, and very much at risk.

Countries that are doing pretty well right now like South Korea, China, New Zealand and Taiwan, have been warned that they are still at risk of infection clusters popping up as seen in China a couple of months ago.

This leaves countries at risk of another wave, and a new list of economic disruptions and pitfalls. Despite this, countries need to find a way to cope and keep their economies flowing to some extent until a vaccine is made available, which may need longer than anticipated.

A study conducted by John Hopkins warns that to loosen social safety precautions may correlate with a spike in cases. Increasingly, we are relying on the individual’s assessment of risk and their precautions to determine the severity of the spike. The trouble is, countries will face challenges keeping cases down at this stage.

Researchers and professionals cast a somewhat bleak picture on the near future. Some estimate the death toll to reach up to a million by 2021, while others make even more concerning projections. “We’ll go well over a million,” says Director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in California, Eric Topol. “I wouldn’t be surprised by 2022 if we go into a couple million or more, knowing that there are so many people out there who are vulnerable.”

The reason for this is because COVID-19 is a “stealthy” virus. Asymptomatic transmission comprises up to 30% of total infection cases, and so we are hunting a black cat at night when it comes to finding and isolating infected clusters.

A new approach to the virus is advised. One that requires individuals to take absolute responsibility over the risks and precautions they are taking. People may have to accept living with COVID-19, and the new changes in their life, and everyone needs to contend with the fact that it’s not over yet, and won’t be for a while longer.

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