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Supernational fronts retaliate against cybercrime group REvil

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Cybercrime group REvil was infiltrated by U.S. governmental agencies and obliged to go dark after cybercrime operation attacking from supernational fronts, reported by Reuters. 

Speculations circulating the group’s recent absence following Recorded Future security specialist Dimitry Smilyanets went to Twitter to reveal various messages from the account of a famous REvil operator, ‘0_neday.’

The messages displayed on the microblogging platform elaborated the events that led to the cybercriminal forum XSS, alleging that someone took charge of the cyber group’s Tor payment portal and was controlling sites’ data leaks.

In the message, the account revealed how he and ‘Unknown, ’chief representative of the cyber entity, were the only group members with REvil’s domain keys. Then, the group’s representative’s absence left other members to predict that he was dead.

In September, REvil proceeded with its cybercrime activities. A factor that led to the realization that the group’s domain name was being reached by Unknown’s decryption key.

“The server was compromised, and they were looking for me. To be precise, they deleted the path to my hidden service in the torrc file and raised their own so that I would go there. I checked on others – this was not. Good luck, everyone, I’m off,” 0_neday wrote in a message.

After REvil’s Kaseya cybercrime, the FBI acquired a universal decryption key initiating file recovery to those exposed to Kaseya’s breach, without the need to pay a ransom.

Now, with the news message surfacing on Twitter, it seems that that law enforcement officials concealed the fact that they had the key for weeks as it was stealthily going after REvil’s staff, according to Reuters. 

In reference to individuals familiar with the topic, law enforcement and intelligent cyber experts managed to compromise the criminal group’s network infrastructure and security management over some of its servers.

Following Unknown’s vanish, other group members re-obtained control over the websites last month. By doing so, REvil unintentionally restarted some intermetal systems, including the ones already powered by law enforcement.

“The REvil ransomware gang restored the infrastructure from the backups under the assumption that they had not been compromised,” deputy head of the forensics lab at the Russian-led security company Group-IB, Oleg Skulkin said in a statement.

“Ironically, the gang’s own favorite tactic of compromising the backups was turned against them,” Skulkin added.

Even though trust-worthy backups are perceived as a fundamental defense tactic to counteract ransomware activities, its vitality lies in remaining unconnected with other main networks. Otherwise, those too will be encrypted by cybercrimes groups similar to REvil.

One spokesperson close to the matter revealed that a foreign ally of the U.S. led the hacking mission that managed to infiltrate REvil’s network, while another anonymous former U.S. official commented on the mission saying the operation has not been finalized.

VMWare’s head of cybersecurity strategy, Tom Kellermann, told Reuters that the victory of federal operations immerges from a deep rigidity led by U.S. Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco, under the belief that cyberattacks on vital governmental ecosystems should be perceived as a threat to the country’s national security, and falls under the same umbrella as terrorist attacks.

The Kesaya and Colonial Pipeline ransomware attacks are the two main cases that paved the way for harsher approaches to navigate this counterattack – and similar future ones – pushed in June the Justice Department to authorize harsher examinations of cyberthreats to much more paramount priority.

REvil’s attacks provided the Justice Department and different government agencies to consider cybercrimes a legal basis to inquire support from other federal organizations, such as the U.S. intelligence and the Department of Defense.

Both the FBI and the White House National Security Council refrained from commenting on the operation.

Daryn is a technical writer with thorough history and experience in both academic and digital writing fields.

Cybersecurity

Panasonic confirms cyber breach to its access data

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Japanese manufacturing titan, Panasonic, confirmed Friday its network has been infiltrated by a cyberattack directed at its access data, on November 11, by gaining entry via third party.

In its statement, the company revealed that “some data on a file server had been accessed during the intrusion.”

This marks the only information publicized by the tech manufacturing giant. However, homegrown publications Mainichi and NHK alleged the breach was initiated June 22 and terminated November 23.

“After detecting the unauthorized access, the company immediately reported the incident to the relevant authorities and implemented security countermeasures, including steps to prevent external access to the network,” Panasonic said in its statement.

“In addition to conducting its own investigation, Panasonic is currently working with a specialist third-party organization to investigate the leak and determine if the breach involved customers’ personal information and/ or sensitive information related to social infrastructure,” it added.

In parallel, NHK disclosed that the breached servers contained data about Panasonic business partners and the manufacturer’s own technology, adding that a previous cyberattack directed at a subsidiary also obtained personal business data.

Panasonic also stated that aside from directing its own probe into the matter, the company is also seeking experts’ assistance by working with a third-party establishment to examine all aspects of the cyberattack. This will help the entity identify whether the infiltration was directed towards clients’ personal data.

“We cannot predict whether it will affect our business or business performance, but we cannot deny the possibility of a serious incident,” the Japanese titan said told one of the publications on Friday.

Earlier in March, Panasonic joined forces with cyber security company McAfee to institute a cybersecurity operations center (SOS) to address the rising risks of these attacks on its infrastructure. The pact will prioritize and strictly focus on detection and response.

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Apple suing Israeli hacker-for-hire company NSO Group

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Tech giant Apple announced Tuesday it is suing Israel’s NSO Group, seeking to block the world’s most infamous hacker-for-hire company from breaking into Apple’s products, like the iPhone.

Apple said in a complaint filed in federal court in California that NSO Group employees are “amoral 21st century mercenaries who have created highly sophisticated cyber-surveillance machinery that invites routine and flagrant abuse.” Apple said NSO Group’s spyware, called Pegasus, had been used to attack a small number of Apple customers worldwide.

“State-sponsored actors like the NSO Group spend millions of dollars on sophisticated surveillance technologies without effective accountability. That needs to change,” said Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering.

NSO Group has broadly denied wrongdoing and said its products have been used by governments to save lives.

“Pedophiles and terrorists can freely operate in technological safe-havens, and we provide governments the lawful tools to fight it. NSO group will continue to advocate for the truth,” the company said in a statement.

It’s the latest blow to the hacking firm, which was recently blacklisted by the U.S. Commerce Department and is currently being sued by social media giant Facebook.

Security researchers have found Pegasus being used around the world to break into the phones of human rights activists, journalists and even members of the Catholic clergy.

Pegasus infiltrates phones to vacuum up personal and location data and surreptitiously controls the smartphone’s microphones and cameras. Researchers have found several examples of NSO Group tools using so-called “zero click” exploits that infect targeted mobile phones without any user interaction.

The Biden administration announced this month that NSO Group and another Israeli cybersecurity firm called Candiru were being added to the “entity list,” which limits their access to U.S. components and technology by requiring government permission for exports.

Also this month, security researchers disclosed that Pegasus spyware was detected on the cellphones of six Palestinian human rights activists. And Mexican prosecutors recently announced they have arrested a businessman on charges he used the Pegasus spyware to spy on a journalist.

Facebook has sued NSO Group over the use of a somewhat similar exploit that allegedly intruded via its globally popular encrypted WhatsApp messaging app. A U.S. federal appeals court issued a ruling this month rejecting an effort by NSO Group to have the lawsuit thrown out.

Apple also announced Tuesday that it was donating $10 million, as well as any damages won in the NSO Group lawsuit, to cybersurveillance researchers and advocates.


RICHMOND, Va. (AP)

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Cybersecurity

Thousands of Phone Numbers Compromised During Robinhood Hack

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Popular investment and trading platform Robinhood stated that “limited information” had been stolen during a cyber-attack targeting the company last week but highlighted that among them were thousands of personal phone numbers.

Robinhood said on Tuesday, that the list obtained by the hackers, which contained email addresses for about five million people and full names for a different group of roughly two million people, included “several thousand entries” with phone numbers.

While the company failed to reveal how many phone numbers were on the list, Motherboard reported that it’s about 4,400.

Motherboard got a copy of the stolen phone numbers “from a source who presented themselves as a proxy for the hackers.” In a statement, Robinhood did not confirm whether the phone numbers Motherboard had obtained, were authentic but did acknowledge that the stolen information included thousands of phone numbers.

However, the blog added: “We continue to believe that the list did not contain Social Security numbers, bank account numbers, or debit card numbers and that there has been no financial loss to any customers as a result of the incident. We’ll continue making appropriate disclosures to affected people.”

The company added: “After we contained the intrusion, the unauthorized party demanded an extortion payment. We promptly informed law enforcement and are continuing to investigate the incident with the help of Mandiant, a leading outside security firm.”

On his side, Robinhood Chief Security Officer Caleb Sima said, “As a Safety-First company, we owe it to our customers to be transparent and act with integrity.”

“Following a diligent review, putting the entire Robinhood community on notice of this incident now is the right thing to do,” he noted.

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