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Top 3 digital health technologies post- pandemic

Mounir Jamil

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Top 3 digital health technologies post- pandemic

It’s certain that the current pandemic will eventually come to an end. However, some of the digital health technologies we’ve adopted along the way have proven to be indispensable, and some technologies may not be so prominent after the crisis.

Here are top 3 digital health technologies that are likely to stick around post- pandemic.

1. Disinfectant robots

Ultraviolet (UV) lights, more specifically UV-C is a well-established digital disinfecting method that is commonly used in the healthcare world. It works by altering the virus’ genetic material, that way UV lights make sure that virus doesn’t replicate. However, if exposed to human skin, it can lead to sunburns, irritations, and in the worst case, skin cancer.

All that aside, the benefits of UV-C in effectively disinfecting hospitals is seriously attracting robotics engineers and healthcare workers alike. Companies such as YouiBot are reimagining and redesigning their current robots into UV disinfectant ones. Danish company UVD Robots has shipped hundreds of their existing disinfectant robots around the world during the pandemic.

In addition to saving valuable time and decreasing the spread of COVID-19 in hospitals, these robots will also prevent hospitals from getting infections.

2. AI for predicting future pandemics

In an ideal tech world, AI can predict a viral outbreak weeks, if not months in advance. Unfortunately, we don’t live in an ideal tech world, but the good news is that we can work towards forecasting such a system with the help of current technologies.

AI company BlueDot has issued early first warnings, after scrutinizing massive data sets from news, airlines, and animal disease outbreaks. Their algorithim managed to detect a certain trend which Epidemiologists later analyzed further to confirm an outbreak.

But BlueDot is the exception and not the rule, so we must reverse the situation in order to better handle the next public health crisis. Given the massive predictive power that AI brings to the healthcare sector, the proper authorities should utilize its full potential and help in making it more commonplace in hospital settings.

3. Remote care via smartphones 

It’s a sad reality that the pandemic kick-started telemedicine for mainstream adoption. Before the crisis, only 1 in 10 US patients used telemedicine services, the number has now increased up to 158% in the same country.

With lockdowns enforced globally, people are utilizing the power of their smartphones for their mental and physical wellbeing. These new digital health technologies greatly reduce the risk of cross infection all while offering patients quality care from the comfort of their own homes

These solutions greatly reduce the risk of cross-infection while offering patients quality care from the comfort of their homes. What’s more, they prove that face-to-face doctor-patient visits are unnecessary. A Global Markets Insights report from April this year, projects that the telemedicine market value will reach $175.5 billion by 2026, indicating the need for remote care in the coming years.

Junior social media strategist with a degree in business. Passionate about technology, film, music and video games.

MedTech

Tech employment – losses and recovery

Adnan Kayyali

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Tech employment

In previous articles, we have tackled the impact of the pandemic on various professions and industries. However, there has been a notable surge in innovation and employment in the tech industry.

This may come as a surprise to many. After all, the pandemic shook the foundations of global market overall, and everything with it. While the tech employment market did take a hit, the impact was substantially less than other industries.

Areas of tech such as cybersecurity, data analysis and science, and communication have been more essential than ever since the pandemic began, and reports confirm that tech employment was on the rise well before the pandemic began.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak until July, the number of jobs in the tech sector had risen by 200,000 while people in other sectors were being laid off. Later however, came the decline. According to Indeed, in June, companies began to slowly cut away at the number of IT jobs made available. Tech employment posts were down as much as 36% by the end of July.

According to an analysis by CompTIA of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ most recent study, IT jobs across all sectors have declined by around 134,000.

Technical IT jobs and help desk work seem to be doing slightly better than others. Companies are still trying to navigate the turbulent changes of the pandemic, and the transitions to remote work, and so most companies, even under economic strain, are reluctant to let go of any IT employees.

“Tech’s failure to recover is probably due to the high cost of hiring and firing”, according to Indeed in a statement to ZDnet “While a restaurant may take on workers based on demand experienced over the past two weeks, sectors like tech have much longer planning horizons.”

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MedTech

Contactless tech deployed in restaurant chains amid pandemic

Mounir Jamil

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As we continue adapting to the pandemic, we notice that our needs as consumers are rapidly changing. Not so long ago, standing in-line at a packed fast food chain, waiting to get served, was considered to be the norm in dining experiences; we can evidently see how this scenario can’t be applied in the time of COVID-19. 

Enter contactless tech – a solution that has proven itself to be a fundamental necessity amid the pandemic. Technology teams from several restaurant chains have been trying to implement contactless tech to streamline visits, enhance the customer journey, and ultimately make their employees life easier. 

Various types of contactless tech ranging from QR codes to robots have aided restaurant chains. We break down the top contactless tech ideas that were brought forward by technology chief attendees of Restaurants Rise powered by MUFSO in a panel titled Touchless Tech: How chains are reimagining technology with the use of contactless ordering and the resurgence of QR codes. The panel was sponsored by Ziosk. 

The comeback of QR codes

QR codes which have already been around for a decade or so, started making their way back into the limelight before the pandemic hit, proving their value as a practical type of contactless tech. QR codes have become an integral part for Tocaya Organica, a 16-unit “experiential fast-casual” chain serving Mexican food in California and Arizona that’s part of The Madera Group.

The technology allows guests to point their smartphones at the codes placed on tables, pull up the restaurant menu and order. Each table has a custom QR code, allowing servers to know where to bring the orders once they’re ready. 

Justin Keenen, Tocaya Organica’s Director of Information Technology commented that the team “had to make sure that that experience carried over as much as possible,” as the restaurant chain moved away from traditional counter service to placing an order at the table using QR codes.

Guests can point their phones at the codes on each table, pull up the restaurant’s menu and order. Each table has its own QR code, so servers know where to bring the orders when they’re ready, and Keenen hired the tech company Thanx to build access to the chain’s loyalty program on top of the Olo ordering software, allowing guests to accrue and redeem points from their phone.       

Keenen added that about 80% of the users surveyed provided “overwhelmingly positive feedback,” with the contactless tech being very easy to use.

Geo-tagged pickup

Popular El Pollo Loco, the fast-casual grilled chicken chain with 480 locations has now enabled geo-tagged curbside pickup at 95% of all its locations according to Andrew Rebhun, the chain’s Vice President and Digital Officer.

With curbside pickup being planned for 2021, once the pandemic hit, those plans were expedited. Rebhun and the team worked to launch the service via the El Pollo Loco app this summer, starting with 20 restaurants and quickly scaling up. 

It’s also a contactless tech that is fairly easy to use. Customers opt into GPS tracking, which will then alert the restaurant as they are driving up, allowing the team members to bring their order directly out to the car. 

Guests that don’t want to opt in for GPS, can simply click the “I’m here” button and a crew member will be out with a face mask to deliver the order. 

Vice President of Technology at White Castle (fast food chain with 360 locations) Susan Carroll-Boser told Restaurants Rise attendees that they are currently testing two new technologies at one location in Indiana: Flippy the Robot and a new drive-thru menu board with artificial intelligence

Flippy the robot

The headline grabber is Miso Robotics’ Flippy the robot.

White Castle is deploying the “robot on a rail” mechanism to work the fry station. It operates above the fryer, so it doesn’t bother any team members.

Flippy operates with a smart freezer provided by Computer Vison. This smart freezer controls portions and schedules when items are to be fried, with human team member supervision

AI Powered Drive-Thru Menu Board

The same White Castle branch in Indiana is also testing an AI powered drive-thru menu board. 

By using voice recognition technology from SoundHound, the menu board has the ability to listen and respond to customers. Guests can select a “known-user experience” that allows the AI to recommend items from the menu tailored to them. 

The contactless tech is also capable of performing “basket analysis” and can assess what’s been ordered and make really good suggestions as to what customers might want to add. 

Using voice recognition technology from SoundHound, the menu board can listen to and respond to customers. According to Carroll-Boser, a person can opt into a “known-user experience” that allows the AI to recommend menu items tailored for the customer.

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MedTech

4 things that will never be the same after COVID-19

Adnan Kayyali

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after covid-19

Education and reopening schools

No parent wants to send their children to school in times like this. Promoting classroom safety or asking children to follow good hygiene practices at all times is both challenging and risky.

Many people have started to question the role of physical schooling facilities for many disciplines and grade levels. Having already incorporated remote work tools and solutions into education, families and students see this as a safer – possibly better – way of learning in the future.

A hybrid system will most likely take over, but ultimately, it is up to each country’s education system to decide what is best for their youth.

Office jobs and remote work

An obvious one. Now that the dye has been cast and many people are required to work from home, there’s no turning back for the workforce after COVID-19.

Many businesses have found that building a successful remote organization is possible and that high work productivity and team collaboration do not require a centralized office. The new transition also saves money on rent and utilities.

There is of course a downside to the shift, but sooner or later, most enterprises will likely adapt.

Healthcare, a new norm

Where going to the doctor’s office for a checkup was the norm, it may be a rarity post-pandemic. The realization has struck many doctors and patients that remote monitoring, counseling and diagnostics are overall convenient, useful, and economically sound ideas to adopt.

Seeing this, it is hard to believe that anyone would go back to the conventional way of doing things without incorporating some level of telehealth. Many young doctors now firmly believe that healthcare will never be the same after COVID-19, and that might be a good thing.

Socializing and the way we greet others

Now the big one. Let admit that handshakes are out of the question at this point. People have taken to air-kisses, hand-on-chest greetings, or nodding and squinting as signs of welcome and acknowledgement.

Pubs and restaurants have had a chance to reinvent themselves. New facilities will adopt new norms and solutions. Open air, delivery friendly, social-distancing establishments are fast becoming the standard or at least the new style. Many have taken to investing in sanitizing robots or temperature detecting cameras to keep themselves and their customers safe and comfortable as hygiene climbs everyone’s list of priorities.

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